Orange County Schools Compete At El Modena High In “Orange County Mathematics Field Day Program”

Hundreds of 4th-, 5th- and 6th-graders showed that it’s cool to be smart as they proved their math skills at the Orange County Mathematics Field Day Program at El Modena High School.

Top math performers from nearly 30 elementary and middle schools in north Orange County teamed up and practiced for months leading to the event, pouring over pre-algebra and geometry problems and learning mental math techniques to prepare for the competition.

Kathy Kim, a fourth-grade teacher and the math coach at Canyon Rim Elementary School in Anaheim Hills said some students, especially girls, shy away from doing well once they reach eighth grade.

Girls scored an average of 542 – 35 points lower than boys – on the SAT math section, according to 2004-2005 California Department of Education data – the most recent statistics available in revealing the gender gap.

“Some kids might be interested in trying out, but they feel like they’ll be labeled,” Kathy said. “What I try to let them know is you can be popular and outgoing and still be good at math.”

Fifth-graders from Anderson Elementary School in Garden Grove put their geometry skills to the test when constructing a boat out of card stock and a sticky label that was to hold pennies inside without sinking.

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/grade-school-elementary-2401832-math-fourth

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Orange County Schools Receive Thirty-One “California Distinguished Schools” Designations

 california-distinguished-school

Thirty-one Orange County public middle schools and high schools have been named California Distinguished Schools, the state’s top honor for campuses.

The prize goes to just 10 percent of campuses statewide.

Orange County School Districts Might Not Receive Much Needed Federal Stimulus Funds As State Of California Would Use Monies To Offset Budget Deficit

California’s independent Legislative Analyst’s Office last week recommended about $3.6 billion more in cuts to public education in the 2009-10 school year, with the intent that federal stimulus money would replace those depleted funds.

“If the state uses the stimulus money to backfill its own coffers, we’re not sure if we will see any of those dollars,” said Renee Hendrick, the Orange County Department of Education’s executive director for business services. “It’s awful. I’m just not sure how districts are going to do it.”

The California Department of Education is anticipated to receive $6 billion in stimulus money through the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund, a pot of money that was presumed to trickle down to school districts and be used to offset their general-fund budget deficits. Education officials also are expecting to receive an additional $2.6 billion earmarked for specific programs.

If the state shaves off $3.6 billion from the stabilization fund, however, school districts will get less than half of the money they were hoping for.

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/education-money-school-2340607-federal-districts

Orange County Middle Schools: Teachers At Pioneer Middle School Earn Top County Marks By Making Sure “No One Falls Through The Cracks”

california-distinguished-school2Five years ago, Pioneer Middle School was a “good” school. It boasted solid standardized test scores, motivated and involved students, and a diverse palette of non-academic offerings.

But administrators at the Tustin school believed Pioneer had the potential to be one of the best public middle schools in the nation, an academic powerhouse where all students achieved at their personal best and no one fell through the cracks.

They shared this ambitious vision with the faculty and, working as a team, began the hard work of radically changing the school’s culture.

“We had always been a good school for most students, but we decided we wanted to be a great school for all students,” Principal Mike Mattos said. “We asked ourselves, ‘How can we create a system that guarantees every kid gets that experience?’ ”

Pioneer’s staff took the next few years to develop and refine a series of customized, targeted intervention strategies that would catch every student and maximize use of the instructional day.

Today, no one falls through the cracks at Pioneer – they simply can’t, teachers say, and test scores prove it. Pioneer’s Academic Performance Index score, an overall gauge of a school’s scholastic showing, has shot up by 70 points over the past five years, to 938, and the school received a coveted federal Blue Ribbon award last year.

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/school-pioneer-students-2333506-kids-student%20

Orange County School District Layoff Updates: Westminster School District And Garden Grove Unified School District Are Not Announcing Any Job Cuts While Los Alamitos Unified School District Says Up To 100 Teachers May Lose Jobs

 LOS ALAMITOS– One hundred teachers may lose their jobs as school officials look to offset a $5.6 million budget deficit prompted by the state’s grim financial status.The district will hand out 100 pink slips to teachers by Sunday, officials said. The slips do not guarantee that teachers will lose their jobs but it warns them of the possibility.

The district is researching possible budget relief measures that could restore some program and personnel cuts, officials said.

Los Alamitos Unified School District serves about 9,400 students in 10 schools in Los Alamitos, Rossmoor and Seal Beach.

School board members have approved $618,000 in cuts to its current $88 million budget and $4 million in reductions to its 2009-10 budget, school officials said.

WESTMINSTER – The school district will not lay off any teachers, but will most likely make the cuts with its temporary teaching staff, officials said.

The Westminster School District cut $3.4 million from its $80 million budget last year in anticipation of the state budget crisis, said district spokeswoman Trish Montgomery. The district also reduced its categorical budgets by 6.5 percent or $500,000, she said.

“We are not planning on laying off any teachers,” Montgomery said. However, the district usually hired about 75 temporary teachers each year, which may change, she said.

“We’re hoping not to lose all of them,” Montgomery said.

GARDEN GROVE — The school district, despite a severe budget deficit, will try not to eliminate teaching positions, officials said.

“We have not nor do we plan to send out any layoff notices to our teachers,” said Alan Trudell, spokesman for the school district. “We’re trying not to cut people, but we are cutting positions.”

The district will also need to scale back on several programs considering the projected $62 million budget shortfall over the next three years, Trudell said.

“That means we’ll be scaling back summer school as well as eliminating most conference attendance,” he said.

The district has also negotiated its teacher-to-student ratio from 29.1 to 31.1 beginning the next school year, Trudell said. But the district will still preserve the 20-to-1 class sizes in grades one, two, three and kinder-1 combination classes.

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/district-trudell-school-2334302-grove-positions

 

(From OC Register articles….)

2008 California Distinguished Elementary Schools In Orange County

 california-distinguished-schoolCalifornia School Recognition Program distinguished school honorees.

Orange Capistrano Unified Chaparral Elementary Elementary
Orange Capistrano Unified R.H. Dana Elementary Elementary
Orange Fountain Valley Elementary William T. Newland Elementary Elementary
Orange Fullerton Elementary Acacia Elementary Elementary
Orange Fullerton Elementary Hermosa Drive Elementary Elementary
Orange Fullerton Elementary Laguna Road Elementary Elementary
Orange Fullerton Elementary Robert C. Fisler Elementary Elementary
Orange Garden Grove Unified Loyal Barker Elementary Elementary
Orange Garden Grove Unified Peters Elementary Elementary
Orange Huntington Beach City Elementa John R. Peterson Elementary Elementary
Orange Huntington Beach City Elementary John H. Eader School Elementary
Orange Irvine Unified Alderwood Basics Plus School Elementary
Orange Irvine Unified Canyon View Elementary Elementary
Orange La Habra City Elementary Ladera Palma Elementary Elementary
Orange La Habra City Elementary Las Lomas Elementary Elementary
Orange Laguna Beach Unified El Morro Elementary Elementary
Orange Laguna Beach Unified Top of the World Elementary Elementary
Orange Los Alamitos Unified Francis Hopkinson Elementary Elementary
Orange Los Alamitos Unified Rossmoor Elementary Elementary
Orange Magnolia Elementary Juliette Low Elementary Elementary
Orange Magnolia Elementary Lord Baden-Powell Elementary Elementary
Orange Newport-Mesa Unified Eastbluff Elementary Elementary
Orange Newport-Mesa Unified Harbor View Elementary Elementary
Orange Newport-Mesa Unified Killybrooke Elementary Elementary
Orange Newport-Mesa Unified Roy O. Andersen Elementary Elementary
Orange Newport-Mesa Unified Sonora Elementary Elementary
Orange Ocean View Elementary Harbour View Elementary Elementary
Orange Ocean View Elementary Hope View Elementary Elementary
Orange Ocean View Elementary Oak View Elementary Elementary
Orange Orange Unified Palmyra Elementary Elementary
Orange Orange Unified Panorama Elementary Elementary
Orange Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified Glenknoll Elementary Elementary
Orange Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified Lakeview Elementary Elementary
Orange Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified Van Buren Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified Del Lago Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified DePortola Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified La Tierra Elementary and Early Childhood Center Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified Lake Forest Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified Lomarena Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified Melinda Heights Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified Rancho Cañada Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified Robinson Elementary Elementary
Orange Saddleback Valley Unified Valencia Elementary Elementary
Orange Santa Ana Unified John Muir Fundamental School Elementary
Orange Santa Ana Unified Santiago Elementary Elementary
Orange Tustin Unified Hicks Canyon Elementary Elementary
Orange Tustin Unified Peters Canyon Elementary Elementary
Orange Tustin Unified Red Hill Elementary Elementary

Orange County Funders Roundtable: Orange County Non-Profit Foundations Facing Declining Revenues With Increased Demand For Services In 2009

 

"We believe that, by working together, the nonprofits of Orange County can strengthen the capacity of our sector and the philanthropic engagement of our community."

"We believe that, by working together, the nonprofits of Orange County can strengthen the capacity of our sector and the philanthropic engagement of our community."

“Reduced donations, increased demand for services and the impact of the state budget crisis on the safety-net providers are putting incredible pressure on our local nonprofits.”

 

 The Orange County Funders Roundtable, a coalition of local foundations, today released the results of a countywide study on how local nonprofits have been affected by the growing economic crisis. With 58% of respondents facing declining revenues in 2009, and over 66% seeing a greater demand for services, the results show that nonprofits have been hit hard by the economic crisis.

“It’s a perfect storm,” said Michael Ruane, Executive Director of the Children and Families Commission of Orange County. “Reduced donations, increased demand for services and the impact of the state budget crisis on the safety-net providers are putting incredible pressure on our local nonprofits.”

The survey highlights these conditions, showing that 46% of nonprofits surveyed have lost granted funds and contracts that were anticipated, and 43% have major donors that were unable to provide continued funding. An additional 33% have already tapped their reserves, and another 13% are using lines of credit to sustain operations.

A growing demand for social services — such as food, shelter and medical care — by newly impacted Orange County residents is also contributing to the strain on local nonprofit organizations. Residents finding themselves newly in need are seeking first-time assistance from a wide range of services and programs. Former two-income families are turning to food banks for groceries to feed their children. And during times of economic hardship, the instance of child abuse and neglect dramatically increases.

“It is critical that the public be aware of the dramatic new needs and challenges that the economic crisis brings to Orange County. The local nonprofit sector plays a vital role in supporting quality of life in our communities,” said Shelley Hoss, President of the Orange County Community Foundation. “But the local nonprofit safety net needs reinforcement. There is an opportunity here for neighbors to help neighbors, for each of us to help, by giving our financial resources and our time.”

The report also highlights the strategies nonprofits executives are using to face these challenges and continue supporting their communities. One survey respondent expressed the fighting spirit of the sector when they said that the economic crisis “…has caused us to reinvent the way in which we meet the needs of our clients, become extremely efficient and to work harder.”

For a complete report on the survey responses visit

 

www.ocfunders.org

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