RealSAVI Number For Capistrano Unified School District

Orange County 2008 API High School Index Average Price Per Sq Ft RealSavi Number Average Price Per Sq Ft RealSavi Number
           
Capistrano Unified SD   Feb-09 Feb-09 Mar-09 Mar-09
Aliso Niguel High School   825  $ 287.33 2.87  $ 294.82 2.80
Capistrano Valley High School  812  $ 283.05 2.87  $ 276.74 2.93
Dana Hills High School            825  $ 334.50 2.47  $ 328.51 2.51
San Clemente High School       816  $ 314.96 2.59  $ 381.82 2.14
San Juan Hills High School  *     748  $ 279.48 2.68  $            
Tesoro High School                            836  $ 265.69 3.15  $ 258.23 3.24

THE REALSAVI NUMBER IS DERIVED BY TAKING THE HIGH SCHOOL’S CURRENT “API” (”ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE INDEX”), WHICH IS FOR 2008, AND DIVIDING IT BY THE AVERAGE SELLING PRICE OF SINGLE FAMILY HOMES (”BY $/SQUARE FOOT’), THEREFORE PRODUCING OUR REALSAVI TM INDEX WHICH REPRESENTS A “SCHOOL-VALUE ADDED” VALUE FOR HOMES SELLING IN THAT HIGH SCHOOL’S DISTRICT AREA.

RealSAVI Number For Anaheim Union High School District

Orange County 2008 API High School Index Average Price Per Sq Ft RealSavi Number Average Price Per Sq Ft RealSavi Number
    Feb-09 Feb-09 Mar-09 Mar-09
Anaheim Union School District              
Anaheim High School 701  $ 215.47 3.25  $ 215.41 3.25
Cypress High School 843  $ 311.56 2.71  $ 309.94 2.72
John F. Kennedy High School 790  $ 258.48 3.06      
Katella 690  $ 231.97 2.97  $ 240.70 2.87
Loara High School 717  $ 232.43 3.08  $ 241.53 2.97
Magnolia High School 698  $ 230.84 3.02  $ 238.17 2.93
Savana High School 697  $ 229.50 3.04  $ 223.49 3.12
Western High School 769  $ 245.59 3.13  $ 229.46 3.35
THE “RealSAVI” NUMBER IS DERIVED BY TAKING THE HIGH SCHOOL’S CURRENT “API” (”ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE INDEX”), WHICH IS FOR 2008, AND DIVIDING IT BY THE AVERAGE SELLING PRICE OF SINGLE FAMILY HOMES (”BY $/SQUARE FOOT’), THEREFORE PRODUCING OUR REALSAVI TM INDEX WHICH REPRESENTS A “SCHOOL-VALUE ADDED” VALUE FOR HOMES SELLING IN THAT HIGH SCHOOL’S DISTRICT AREA.
 

 

Tustin Unified School District: $12.5 Million To Be Eliminated From $160 Million Budget; “Categorical Money” From Federal Stimulus Funds Are Very Restrictive Says Superintendent

Some school leaders said that restrictions on how stimulus dollars can be used are boxing them in.

“Getting more categorical money—that’s nice for the few of our schools that are Title I schools, but not all of our schools are Title I schools,” said Richard Bray, the superintendent of the 21,000-student Tustin Unified School District in southern California.

The district plans to cut about $12.5 million in the next fiscal year from a budget of $160 million. Teachers will be laid off, and programs such as elementary school music will be eliminated, Mr. Bray said, noting that the city plans to start providing a music program.

There are dollars available that can be used for general education purposes, Mr. Bray said, but superintendents will have to lobby for them in competition with colleges and universities.

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2009/04/08/28districts.h28.html

Orange County Schools Receive Thirty-One “California Distinguished Schools” Designations

 california-distinguished-school

Thirty-one Orange County public middle schools and high schools have been named California Distinguished Schools, the state’s top honor for campuses.

The prize goes to just 10 percent of campuses statewide.

Tustin Public Schools Foundation And Prime Credit Funding In Promotional Partnership With “PrimeStudent” To Donate $100 To Tustin Unified School District Schools For Every Home Loan Funded In Disctrict

primestudentlogo2

 

 

Prime Credit Funding is

committed to supporting local

education.

 

 

  

(Click Here To Find Out More)

(Click Here)

With our PrimeStudent Program, we will donate

$100 to the Tustin Public Schools Foundation for

every home loan we close within the Tustin Unified

School District in 2009.

California State Ballot Measures Needed To Help Solve Budget Crisis And Fund Schools Are Falling Short Of 50% Support In May Special Election

Five state ballot measures aimed at solving California’s budget crisis are falling short of the support needed to pass in the May special election, a sign that voters may force lawmakers into another fierce clash over tax hikes and spending cuts, according to a poll released Wednesday.

The state’s dismal economy has already partly unraveled the budget deal that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the Legislature reached last month, with a drop in tax collections leaving a new $8-billion shortfall. Rejection of the ballot measures would widen the gap to nearly $14 billion.

The least popular measure, Proposition 1C, is also the one that state leaders are counting on most for immediate fiscal relief: It would let the state borrow $5 billion against future lottery revenues. The cost, to be paid over decades, would be billions in new interest obligations, and less lottery money to meet future spending needs.

The poll by the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute of California found that Proposition 1C would lose in a rout if the May 19 election were held today, with 37% of likely voters in favor and 50% opposed.

Faring slightly better, but still decisively rejected, would be Proposition 1A. It would cap state spending while extending billions in temporary tax hikes for an extra two years. The survey found 39% of likely voters for the measure and 46% against it.

So far, Proposition 1A is the measure that has drawn the most attention. Conservatives on talk radio, enraged by the extension of the tax hikes, have made its defeat a top priority. Some labor unions are weighing whether to campaign against the spending cap.

The dynamics of the special election are volatile, and public opinion could swing dramatically once campaign advertising begins. The poll found more than 10% of likely voters are undecided on most of the ballot measures. Also, voter turnout is likely to be low, and it is unclear what mix of Californians will wind up casting ballots in the oddly timed election.

Passage of each ballot measure requires at least one vote above 50%. Three measures were winning a plurality of support in the poll, but still falling short of the 50% threshold. The poll has a margin of sampling error of three percentage points among likely voters.

The poll found likely voters lukewarm on twin measures to loosen restrictions on money that Californians have dedicated solely to children’s health and mental health programs under previous initiatives.

Both measures, Propositions 1D and 1E, fall a few points short of 50%, but more voters backed them than opposed them.

Voter sentiment was split on Proposition 1B, which puts money into schools in future years to make up for cuts this year, with 44% in favor and 41% opposed. Lawmakers made it part of the ballot package in part to dissuade the state’s potent teachers unions from joining the opposition campaign.

All in all, “the supporters of the propositions have their work cut out for them,” said pollster Mark Baldassare, president of the policy institute.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-poll26-2009mar26,0,3460616.story

Tustin Public Schools Foundation Announces 2009 “Dinosaur Dash Run For Education” Logo Winner For November 1 Event

dinosaurdash20091

(CLICK ON PHOTO TO DONATE TO TUSTIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS)

Beckman High student Robert Lieu’s design won the Tustin Public Schools Foundation’s logo contest for the 2009 Dinosaur Dash Run for Education.

The foundation received 65 entries from Tustin students. Lieu won the $100 prize, and his teacher, Gigi Manning, will receive $100 for classroom art supplies.

The Dinosaur Dash will be Sunday, Nov. 1 at the Market Place in Tustin at Jamboree Road and Bryan Avenue. Proceeds benefit schools in the Tustin Unified School District.

http://www.ocregister.com/ocregister/news/local/tustin/article_2343595.php